Leadership

Board of Trustees

The members of the Responsible Mining Foundation’s Board function as the supervisory authority of the Foundation overseeing its strategy, policies and course of action.

May Hermanus is a geologist with expertise in large-scale mining. She was most recently the Executive Director of the Natural Resources and Environmental Unit of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa. Her interest in sustainable development stems from long standing involvement, since 1982, in occupational health and safety, and other industry related issues. She has worked in the NGO, trade union, private and public sectors in South Africa, and in various International Labour Organisation forums. She is a former Chief Inspector of Mines for South Africa, currently a visiting Adjunct-Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand, and continues to work as an Non-Executive Director and on various projects which align with her experience and interests.


Humberto Campodonico is a recognized academic and commentator on economic development, particularly in Latin America. Based in Lima, he has a wealth of experience in the extractives, energy, government, multilateral and private sector. Previous positions include Regional Adviser on mining and energy at Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC/United Nations); Prof and Dean at the Economics Faculty, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; President of PETROPERU; Consultant of the Andean Community of Nations to ECLAC, and UNCTAD, Geneva. He is a principal researcher at the Centro de Estudios y Promoción del Desarrollo (DESCO), Lima; on the Advisory Board of Natural Resources Governance Institute (NRGI); a Fellow of the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), Washington, D.C.; a Senior Research Associate of the South Centre, Intergovernmental Organization of Developing Countries, Geneva; and economics columnist at the Peruvian national daily La República. Humberto has published several books about mining, energy (oil, natural gas), and international economics and trade.


Ron Popper is an independent consultant on corporate responsibility, business and human rights, and issues and crisis management. He has 15 years’ experience in the business and human rights field, including 10 years as head of Corporate Responsibility at the Switzerland-based multinational ABB. In that role, he focused on human rights due diligence, and stakeholder engagement in different parts of the world. Ron Popper is a Trustee and Advisory Council member of the Institute for Human Rights and Business, and co-chair of the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights. He lectures regularly on corporate responsibility at business schools and universities in Switzerland and the United Kingdom.


Arent van Wassenaer is a highly experienced international projects lawyer. He now works with clients to ensure the successful development of large scale projects, with a positive impact on one or more of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Between 2011 and 2013 he was the chair of the Section of Energy and Environmental, Natural Resources and Infrastructure Law of the International Bar Association. Arent is a substitute judge with the Court of Appeals Arnehm-Leeuwarden (The Netherlands). He sits on the board of several cultural and not for profit organisations such as Terre des Hommes (NDL). His latest publication, A Practical Guide to Successful Construction Projects, is due out in June 2017.


Samuel Kofi Woods II is a Liberian human rights Lawyer and academic. In 1991 he worked with the Catholic Bishops of Liberia to establish the Catholic Justice and Peace Commission which documented human rights abuses during the Liberian Civil War. He has worked tirelessly in the field of human rights and exposing child labour practices and injustice throughout Liberia. In 2006 Woods became the Minister of Labor under President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and in 2009 Minister of Public Works until his resignation in 2013. He won the Reebok Human Rights Award in 1994, and received the Pope’s human rights medal. He is a member of the International Advisory Board of CORDAID, and was a Goodwill Ambassador for Save the Children Netherlands during the Ebola Crisis.


Hélène de Villiers-Piaget is the CEO of the Responsible Mining Foundation which she joined in January 2015. She was previously a director at Normann Partners and has extensive experience consulting on organisational resilience, transitional processes and leadership perspective in a range of business sectors including mining, statutory bodies, and public interest initiatives in both developed and developing country contexts. With her background in scenarios-based strategy, systems thinking and stakeholder engagement, she shares the RMF view that responsible mining should benefit the economies, improve the lives of people and respect the environments of producing countries, and from a systems perspective, she believes that we, all of society, are collectively responsible for mining and its impacts and benefits through our consumer choices and the expectations we set for mining companies and the governments that regulate them.


Advisory Council

Members of the Advisory Council represent a range of expertise and experience and act in an advisory capacity to the Responsible Mining Foundation and the Responsible Mining Index Report. The Advisory Council is chaired by H.R.H. Prince Jaime de Bourbon de Parme.

H.R.H. Prince Jaime de Bourbon de Parme supports the Responsible Mining Foundation in his personal capacity. Previously, Jaime was the Special Envoy on Natural Resources at the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His main focus was long-term and sustainable security of supply of energy, metals and minerals. In this capacity he initiated the Responsible Mining Index. He set up the Conflict Free Tin Initiative, which brings traceable minerals from conflict prone areas in Congo to the international market. He also brokered a deal with Bolivia, which has the greatest deposits of lithium in the world, to help industrialize their lithium sector.


Joan Carling belongs to the Kankanaey, Igorot tribe from the Cordillera Region, Philippines. She was the Secretary General, and consequently the Chairperson of the Cordillera Peoples’ Alliance (CPA) from 1997-2006. She has been an indigenous activist for more than two decades working on human rights, environment and development issues relating to indigenous peoples from the grassroots, national, regional and international levels. Carling serves on numerous international boards and panels, such as the UNDP Advisory Board for the Regional Programme for Indigenous Peoples, the IFAD Advisory Board for Grants for Indigenous Peoples and the Steering Committee of the Indigenous Peoples International Network on Climate Change and Sustainable Development. Until 2016 she was the Secretary General of the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP).


Chen Feng is Chairman of the China Chamber of Commerce of Metals, Minerals, Chemicals Importers and Exporters (CCCMC), Vice Chairman of China-ASEAN Chamber of Agricultural Commerce, executive committee member of International Council of Chemical Trade Associations, council member of China Chamber of International Commerce and The Cross-strait Trade Association. Chairman of CCCMC since 2012, he supports dialogue with governments and non-governmental organizations, focuses on mineral resources development in conflict areas, promotes cooperation on social responsibilities, guides Chinese enterprises to protect human rights, and practice responsible conduct in overseas mining investment. Under his guidance, the CCCMC published “Guidelines for Social Responsibility in Outbound Mining Investment”in 2014, and ‘Chinese Due Diligence Guidelines for Responsible Mineral Supply Chains’ in 2015.


Anthony Hodge is currently Senior Scholar in Residence at the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Engineering, Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. His 40-year career has spanned a rich array of assignments – in the private sector, with government, in quasi-judicial processes, in civil society organizations, in communities, and with Indigenous peoples. In September 2015, he stepped down after serving for 7 years as President of the International Council on Mining and Metals. Throughout he has explored both technical and social dimensions of achieving human and ecosystem well-being over the long term, seeking common ground between actors and integrating multiple values into the solutions to some of the most difficult socio-technical-environmental-financial challenges facing today’s society.


Daniel Kaufmann is President of the Natural Resource Governance Institute, formerly Revenue Watch Institute – Natural Resource Charter. An economist, he has pioneered innovative approaches to measure and analyze governance and corruption, and has deep practical experience in helping countries formulate and carry out governance reforms. His research has extended to economic development, investment, privatization and urban and labor economics. Kaufmann served as a senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program at the Brookings Institution. He previously served as a director of the World Bank Institute. He held senior management positions focused on governance, finance and anti-corruption, and was lead economist is the World Bank’s research department. He was first Chief of Mission of the World Bank to Ukraine, worked on capacity building in Latin America and on economic reforms in Africa.


Wim Leereveld is CEO and Founder of the Access to Medicine Index, which ranks the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies every two years on their policies and practices for improving access to medicine for people living in low-income and middle-income countries. Before establishing the Index, Wim was co-founder of PMSI and Walsh International, leading providers of information services to the healthcare industry. Both companies went on to be listed on the NASDAQ stock exchange. While working with the healthcare industry Wim had the idea of creating the Access to Medicine Index. Knowing that around two billion people have no access to affordable medicine worldwide, Wim decided to develop a ranking that revealed which of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies were doing the most to make their medicine accessible for these people. By publically recognising the best performers in this way, the Index stimulates the industry to improve and innovate.


Afshin Mehrpouya is an assistant professor of accounting and management control systems at HEC Paris. Trained as a medical doctor in Iran, Afshin also holds an MBA and PhD in management. His research is broadly in transnational governance. He currently studies the role of the discourses and practices of “transparency” and emerging calculative knowledge forms in transnational governance regimes. He has years of experience in the design of environmental and social rankings and ratings. Afshin was in charge of developing the methodology, stakeholder engagement and analysis for Access to Medicine Index 2010 and advised the methodology team for Access to Medicine Index 2012. He has also advised a range of other development and sustainability related initiatives such as Aid Transparency Index, Medicines Transparency Alliance, Corporate Human Rights Benchmark, Access to Nutrition Index and COHRED Fairness Index.


Glen Mpufane is Director of Mining for IndustriALL Global Union, a global union federation based in Geneva, Switzerland. Previously, Glen was a Mining Officer for ICEM, one of the predecessor GUFs of IndustriALL Global Union. Before joining the ICEM, he spent most of his working life working for the mining industry and for the National Union of Mineworkers. Glen has served on various local and international committees. Glen has a bachelor’s degree in sociology. A native of South Africa, he currently lives with his wife and two sons in Geneva, Switzerland.


Elisa Peter is the Executive Director of Publish What You Pay – a global network of 700 civil society organisations working to promote transparency and accountability in the extractive industries. She has 20 years of experience in policy analysis, campaign coordination and movement building in the fields of sustainable development, international relations, human rights, climate change and transparency. She has worked for the United Nations, international NGOs and research institutes. She holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School.


Lisa Sachs is the Director of the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI), a joint Center of Columbia Law School and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Since joining CCSI in 2008, she established and now oversees the three areas of focus for CCSI: investments in extractive industries, investments in land and agriculture, and investment law and policy. She also teaches a masters seminar at Columbia University on Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development. She is a member of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s thematic group on the Good Governance of Extractive and Land Resources and is Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Mining & Metals.


Robyn Scott is Co-founder of Brothers for All, a South African social business which provides programming skills to prisoners, ex-offenders and at-risk youth and works with global companies operating in Africa to place graduates in jobs. Prior to this she co-founded OneLeap, which helps large corporations develop innovative solutions to commercial, social and environmental challenges by working with experienced entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurs. She has worked at BP and the Financial Times, and written a bestselling book about the AIDS epidemic in Botswana. Her background is in health economics and in 2007 she joined the Access to Medicine Index as an ambassador, supporting the launch of the first index. She is a Gates Cambridge Scholar and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader.


Isabelle van Notten helped to found and develop the Responsible Mining Index and was the Foundation’s CEO and then COO for a period of four years until December 2017. She remains committed to the quest that mining contributes to the quality of people’s lives in producing countries and communities and continues to support the Foundation as a member of the Advisory Council. Prior to joining the Responsible Mining Foundation, Isabelle worked for fifteen years as an advisor in the areas of responsible business conduct and development cooperation. She has a background both in manufacturing and developmet cooperation and is based in The Netherlands.


Sustainability expert and social entrepreneur with more than a decade of international experience in implementing sustainable development programs, with a focus in Latin America. Previously Executive Director at the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM), creators of Fairmined certification for artisanal and small scale gold. Extensive experience working with local communities, governments and companies to address supply chain sustainability issues. Partner at Reflejarse, Colombia-based consultancy firm supporting companies and social organizations to embed sustainability into strategy and reporting practices.


Luc Zandvliet is driven by the opportunities that the presence of mining companies provides to improve the quality of life for local communities, especially in areas where other prospects are limited. Luc is the Director of Triple R Alliance Inc., a small collective of experts who support the social performance approaches of mining companies operating in frontier markets. He has conducted over 80 site visits to mining operations in 25 countries working on company-community relation issues, in most cases at the request of the companies themselves. Before starting Triple R, Luc, together with Mary Anderson, co-authored Getting it Right; Making Company-Community Relations Work, which documents best practices with regard to company/community relations in contexts of social and political instability.


Expert Review Committee

The Expert Review Committee consists of leading international experts in relevant fields with primary responsibility for methodological guidance on the research undertaken by the Responsible Mining Foundation.

Fritz Brugger holds a PhD in Development Studies from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. Currently, he serves as Senior Scientist at ETH Zurich, Centre for Development and Cooperation (NADEL). He is conducting extensive research on the developmental effects of natural resource extraction, resource governance and on the role of extractive companies for the last eight years; he has linked this research with the topic of commodity-related global financial flows more recently. Among others, Fritz is principal investigator of the 3-year research project “Measuring the development outcomes of resource extraction in producer countries“ funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. Further, Fritz Brugger has 20 years professional experience in development cooperation and has worked for a SRI fund advising multinational companies on CSR issues in developing countries.


Sonia Balcazar de Meza-Cuadra is a Consultant Associate at Synergos Consulting Services, based in New York. She is a Peruvian economist with extensive on-the-ground experience in international socio-economic development and corporate social responsibility. Prior to joining Synergos, Sonia was the Regional Development Planning Manager for Rio Tinto´s La Granja Project in Peru from 2007 to 2013. Currently, she is also a lecturer at the Executive Training Program on Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development at Columbia University, Vice-Chairman of the Women International Forum, and manager of ‘El Conocimiento se Comparte.


Li Li, Ph.D in economics, is Associate Professor of Institute of International Economy, University of International Business and Economics (UIBE) and Director of China Research Center for Technical Barriers to Trade (CCTBT), UIBE. Her main research fields include Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development, Trade and Environment. She is registered expert of ISO Social Responsibility Working Group for ISO26000, and expert of China’s special working group on ISO social responsibility issues. She has participated the development of ISO260000, and the translation of ISO26000 into Chinese, the development of ISO 20121 and ISO Guide82, also participated the drafting of several CSR related standard and guidelines in China including the recent guidelines published for the mining industry by the CCCMC.


Glen Mpufane is Director of Mining for IndustriALL Global Union, a global union federation based in Geneva, Switzerland. Previously, Glen was a Mining Officer for ICEM, one of the predecessor GUFs of IndustriALL Global Union. Before joining the ICEM, he spent most of his working life working for the mining industry and for the National Union of Mineworkers. Glen has serves on various local and international committees including the steering committee of IRMA which is developing a mine certification standard for responsible mining. Glen has a bachelor’s degree in sociology. A native of South Africa, he currently lives with his wife and two sons in Geneva, Switzerland.


Lisa Sachs is the Director of the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI), a joint Center of Columbia Law School and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Since joining CCSI in 2008, she established and now oversees the three areas of focus for CCSI: investments in extractive industries, investments in land and agriculture, and investment law and policy. She also teaches a masters seminar at Columbia University on Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development. She is a member of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s thematic group on the Good Governance of Extractive and Land Resources and is Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Mining & Metals.


Prabindra Shakya is a human rights activist from Nepal, focusing on promoting and protecting the rights of indigenous peoples and minorities for the past decade. He is specialized in business and human rights frameworks and impacts of international investments on the rights and livelihoods of indigenous peoples and minorities. He currently works as the Senior Adviser at Manushya Foundation, an Asia regional NGO based in Thailand focusing on business and human rights processes, among other areas in Thailand and other countries in the region. He was earlier engaged as the Human Rights Programme Coordinator in the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact and also consulted for the Secretariat of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. He has extensive experience advocating for the human rights of indigenous peoples and other marginalized communities of Nepal and Asia, including in relation to mining projects, at national and international levels.


Ingrid Watson leads the Centre for Sustainability in Mining and Industry’s (CSMI) work on environment, biodiversity, mine closure and land use. The CSMI, based in the School of Mining Engineer at Wits University, is a centre of excellence promoting good practice and good governance in the mining sector through research, dialogue and capacity-building. Before joining the CSMI in 2009, she had a successful career progression working on land reform in government, and then for mining company De Beers; in their global exploration environmental practice, and as assurance manager for environment and community.


Luc Zandvliet is driven by the opportunities that the presence of mining companies provides to improve the quality of life for local communities, especially in areas where other prospects are limited. Luc is the Director of Triple R Alliance Inc., a small collective of experts who support the social performance approaches of mining companies operating in frontier markets. He has conducted over 80 site visits to mining operations in 25 countries working on company-community relation issues, in most cases at the request of the companies themselves. Before starting Triple R, Luc, together with Mary Anderson, co-authored Getting it Right; Making Company-Community Relations Work, which documents best practices with regard to company/community relations in contexts of social and political instability.